While this could cause some to jump out of their stupor and play this game immediately, it’s worth considering a few points before you devote your life to shooting incredibly garish bows for the rest of your days.

Firstly, the controls. As a touchscreen game based around archery, the controls are obviously of paramount importance. Luckily, Bow Archer is perfectly competent in this regard – you drag your finger across the screen, find the angle you want and… let go. You shoot, then it moves towards them and you hopefully hit them.

The hopefully part is the problem, however. There is no scrolling across your screen to see where they are, no scientific guessing or angle predictions like in Angry Birds, you just have to fire completely blind at your enemy. Whether they are a bespectacled super-villain or a cartoonish maid (the designs are particularly gaudy in this game) it doesn’t matter; it’s all guess work on the first round.

Considering the entirety of this game is shooting arrows at vaguely evil looking creatures, you’d think it would be as user-friendly as possible. However, there’s literally only one thing to do.

However, there’s literally only one thing to do.

You aim somewhat randomly, fire at the enemy until your shot connects then just repeat the same process, same angle of elevation and direction and everything. You repeat this cycle of taking turns firing at one another until you win the round and move on to do it again to a different brightly colored adversary.

It’s honestly quite boring. Where’s the challenge? The variety? It doesn’t try to sell itself as some kind of extravagant game, but it’s clear there has been very little effort put into designing any further gameplay than just firing arrows somewhat towards the right place.

The only good thing about the actual gameplay is the extremely satisfying, visceral sound an enemy makes upon being shot in the face. You get a small “Headshot” notification and a grizzly, bone-crunching noise as the enemy crumples into a depressed little heap. It’s quite pleasant.

You get a small “Headshot” notification and a grizzly, bone-crunching noise as the enemy crumples into a depressed little heap. It’s quite pleasant.

However, Bow Archer does its best to thrust other things in your face – no, not arrows (though they’d certainly be preferable), but ads. Lots and lots of ads.

All mobile games need to include some kind of advertisements to be able to generate revenue, but the sheer audacity of Bow Archer in this regard deserves a special mention.

Every single thing you do in this game, every menu option you click, every sequence you begin or end, spawns an ad. You get used to seeing them in mobile games, but it is almost certain that more time is spent watching ads than actually playing Bow Archer.

When you combine the general lack of any variety or actual objective other than repeating the same task over and over, with an overabundance of advertisements you get… life.

But you also get Bow Archer, sadly.

[appbox googleplay com.hopegame.bowarcher]