In each level you are trying to have enough buildings constructed to be able to advance. The cost of each building ramps up incrementally, meaning you need to focus on other upgrades consistently to balance out the increased cost.

Money is earned through buildings, cars purchased (which are presumably from… ticket fines? I’m not sure) and also from money spontaneously appearing over the roaming cars. This creates an active element to money generation, as well as needing to click on the Build command to improve your already present buildings. As this takes time, this creates an additional active element to gameplay.

All of this combines into a pretty intelligent game model – balance your income, improve and upgrade consistently and improve your revenue stream through active clicking. There are few times when you find yourself bored, as the mix of passive waiting and active clicking leaves you yearning for continuous upgrades that are always just a few coins away.

The game’s monetary revenue system is actually really impressive: the game starts you with 24 hours of double speed, meaning everything happens faster and easier. After this initial period, it drops to “normal” speed. Then, you are forced to either pay for permanent double speed for $5 or – and this is something I really like – you watch a 10-30 second video ad for ten minutes of double speed. It’s a great way to trade time instead of money for… more time. Still, it’s pretty consumer friendly and makes it not so especially pay to win.

The main issue I might say is that this game is horrendously easy to play for hours on end, until you suddenly realize you’re dehydrated and your eyes have glazed over.

A few criticisms I have are mainly focused on the lack of transparency for the game itself. At the start, I was incredibly confused as to what I was supposed to do and came very close to turning it off altogether. The in-game tutorial could certainly do with some improvement, to say the least. Alongside this, there doesn’t seem to be a clear breakdown of income; this is incredibly frustrating as, at the start, it is difficult to ascertain where your actual income is coming from. This isn’t a huge issue, but it would be nice to clearly see how I’m raking in the millions.

Bit City maintains a prestige system that harkens back to Call of Duty multiplayer and is present in most clicker games of this type, wherein you can choose to start right back at the very first level with a percentage income bonus. You can thus essentially complete the game again and again and again, each time gaining more and more income bonuses until eventually you can stare at your accomplishments and know that you have truly achieved glory in mobile game history.

Bit City is honestly a really fun game – it has just the right combination of active and passive gameplay, as well as a myriad of upgrades and achievable small goals, to be absolutely addicting. The main issue I might say is that this game is horrendously easy to play for hours on end, until you suddenly realize you’re dehydrated and your eyes have glazed over. Not a terrible price to pay, I suppose.

[appbox googleplay com.nimblebit.bitcity]