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Android devices no longer NSFW with Motorola 3LM release

by Kristen Nicole

RIM may not have the market prowess it once did, losing ground to Android and iOS, but the company that brought us the BlackBerry has influenced culture at the corporate level, merging mobile technology and office work in a most convenient form. Android’s taking a cue from RIM, incorporating more enterprise and security features into devices thanks to 3LM, a company acquired by Motorola Mobility earlier this year.

With the release of an enterprise-grade security and management tool for Android devices, 3LM works directly with manufacturers (including HTC and Sony Ericsson) to deeply integrate its software. It lets corporate IT departments support Android devices for workers that bring smartphones and tablets to the office, enabling security for the office network as well as the device itself. 3LM’s technology encrypts the phone’s memory and SD card, and can selectively add further encryption on enterprise-related portions of the phone. Employers can also track app use for security purposes, and the software can remote-wipe Android device memory in the event the phone is lost or stolen.

Security apps carve their own distribution channels

3LM’s new product is the latest in a growing trend around mobile security, which has flourished from third party app offerings in the wake of Android’s detrimental summer of Trojans and malware. As consumers impact the workplace by bringing their own devices and demanding network support, enterprise-grade security is also striving to meet the needs of a shifting office attitude. Security is finding every access point imaginable, attracting carrier interest as well. AT&T just launched Toggle, a security feature based on Entreproid that creates two separate device profiles for work and play.

Opportunity in protecting Android enterprise tablets

A huge opportunity lies in tablet security, too. Tablets will become an important device for the enterprise space, and it’s one that the iPad has already claimed for its own. Designing even more around tablet protection will give security services a head start in the Android space as employees will be more likely to connect and work on a tablet rather than a smartphone. Android’s already lost its footing around security with the rapid rise in smartphone adoption, but with a clear objective for the tablet space, it could avoid making the same mistake twice.