Android is virtually everywhere, from docks to clouds

by Kristen Nicole

Motorola docks get smarter

Our smartphones are now as powerful as many of our computers, reiterating the trend towards interoperable devices. Motorola (MMI) is taking a literal approach with the Atrix, a laptop dock you can plug your phone into. Motorola CEO Sanjay Jha reportedly had good news for investors yesterday, saying the company will be bringing its Webtop apps and their corresponding docks to its high-end smartphone lineup in the second half of this year.

It’s good news for the dock concept, which is yet another manifestation of mobile-PC interoperability. Google (GOOG) may not have made a device specific for this, but its recent availability of mobile app management via the web adds multiple points of access. Apple (AAPL) has applied a similar tactic for iOS, ensuring a more fluid experience amongst devices. While these integrated platform offerings are free, Motorola’s docking bundle will run you about $500 with a two-year contract.

The mobile cloud takeover

The cloud is facilitating several ways to make our smartphones more functional, and Verizon’s (VZ) unified communications plans will turn your Android into a business desktop phone. Through a platform called Verizon Mobile UC, the desktop phone also features a mobile phone dock, connecting to the enterprise LAN via Ethernet. It’s designed as an enterprise solution, giving employees the ability to make calls without using precious daytime minutes.

Cloud services are also helping the enterprise from a security standpoint, developing separate profiles for Android devices so personal and professional content don’t overlap. Entreproid launched its Divide service at DEMO this week, providing a platform for corporate workers to maintain secure, work-related interactions on their mobile devices. Divide is currently available for Android, in private beta.