The Sims 3 for Android has plenty of personality

by Caitlin M. Foyt

Those who have spent any kind of time with the PC version of The Sims 3 and enjoyed it will also get a kick out of the mobile version of the game for Android.

Just like in the computer games, The Sims and The Sims 2, players create a sim character, and customize the way he or she looks, give it a name, and select a personality. The purpose of the game is then to control the sim's every move, and satisfy its basic needs, such as making sure he or she eats, sleeps, and takes a shower once in a while. You also help your sim to make friends, fall in love, find a job, or start a family. If you're a little less traditional, you can throw a whole lot of parties, create your evil alter-ego, grow corn in your backyard, or sit on the couch and watch TV all day. What's great about this game is that there is no set outcome because you create your sim's life path.

Even if you've never played a Sims game in your life, you'll have no trouble picking this up. I've never seen an app with a more thorough set of gameplay instructions. Immediately after launch, as you are just starting to feel your way around the game, bubbles will pop up to explain how to move your sim around the room, how to pan the camera, how to interact with objects, what the icons mean, etc. Every question you could possibly have about how to play is quickly and thoroughly explained.

Sims aficionados will immediately notice this is not the same version of the game they'd play if they were to boot up the same title on their computer. In the Android version, instead of having an entire family to look after, like you do in the PC edition, you control just one character.

But, don't fret. You'll soon see that the spirit of the game is maintained. You don't feel like you're missing out on anything, and this game isn't any less interesting than the original.

The app version of The Sims 3 uses the same "personality traits" system and has the whole sim town for your sim to venture out into. While there are not as many interior-design options in this mobile version of the game, players can still redecorate their homes by customizing walls and carpet and upgrading their furniture. There are also a bunch of mini-games included that have you doing things like going fishing, cooking, and gardening.

If you still want to see how your sim's life evolves, but you don't have the same kind of time to play video games that you did when you were a kid, there's a way to keep the game going in your absence. It's an option called "Story Progression," and it allows your sim to autonomously continue as though you were still in control.

The Sims 3 is definitely worth the $5 download because it's the kind of game you'll keep coming back to. This game stays interesting, there's no lag when it's loading, and its vibrant graphics and easy-to-use controls make full use of Android's high-def capabilities.