Learn about American commanders-in-chief with U.S. Presidents Android app

by Caitlin M. Foyt

Presidents Day is as good of a time as any to bone up on your U.S. history. Just the tool to get the job done, U.S. Presidents for your Android phone is a helpful study guide for people of all ages.

U.S. Presidents by Socratica, LLC (take note, there are a lot more apps in the Android Marketplace dedicated to our nation's leaders than you might think) is an app that tends to stick to the basic facts about our 44 presidents: which number he is, details on his birth and death, political party, when he took office and left office, who the vice president who served beside him was, and even some random trivia.

Click on the "Learn" tab on the app's homepage, and you can scroll through a brief profile page for every U.S. president. "Lookup" allows you to search by name, or you can pull a name from the app's index.

"Quiz," obviously, is where you go when you want to put what you've learned to the test. The app gives you the option to select your "practice field," which is the "topic" you want to be tested on. Birth, death, number, etc. There's also an option for the app to fire random questions at you, if you like.

“Parade” plays patriotic music while a slideshow of all the presidents' photos plays. It actually might be a more fun way for younger kids to learn the order in which these politicians took office.

My favorite part about U.S. Presidents was the random piece of trivia listed on each president's profile. When I was reading about James Madison, I indirectly learned something I hadn't known about American history. Madison had to move out of the White House in 1814 because of a fire, and was never given the chance to move back in. This inspired me to do a Google search, and I learned that the official residence of the president wasn't always in D.C. It was originally in New York.

Depending upon whom you ask, the fact that this app links to Wikipedia and relies on this website as a source of information is a big bummer. The site has definitely established itself as a helpful Internet resource, but because all of the information comes from contributors across the web, there's no guarantee that it's correct. Not only that, educators of young kids, I'm sure, have a difficult enough time trying to reinforce the message that it's better to stick with reputable sources over sites like Wikipedia.

In case you're curious about a president or want to refresh your knowledge of American history, this is a great app to check out.

Download the free Appolicious Android app