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Free educational Android games for elementary school kids

by Larry Sullivan

These days, kids are playing more and more games thanks to the accessibility and ease-of-use found in Android smartphones and tablets. What if they could play games and learn something at the same time? Today’s post covers a few games that are available for children at the elementary school level, where the foremost goal is to learn. After all, knowledge is power.

Doctor Numbers Math Free (Free)

Doctor Numbers Math comes in free and paid versions, the latter costs $1.29 and lacks in-app advertisements. The game is pretty simple to set up; you can adjust the difficulty setting from one to four gears (easy to hard), choose from five different languages, and toggle sounds on or off. In the game, the object is to get the best score each round. The game does not save your scores, so it is purely to help improve your student’s math skills.

Each round of Doctor Numbers Math is practically the same. You are provided with 10 math questions and a set amount of time to answer the problem. I should mention, though, that you are given four possible solutions to choose from, because who doesn’t love multiple choice? As you increase the difficulty level, the math gets more complex. The game covers addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, fractions, and linear equations for students who are feeling a bit more confident and adventurous.

Kids Logic (Preview) (Free)

There are free and paid versions of Kids Logic Preview, as well. The free version lets you to play only five to six screens per category. There is no set up to the app, making it simple to turn on, pick a category, and begin. The graphics are very kid-friendly and bright. There is no background music , but there are encouraging voices and applause when your kids answers correctly. If you get an answer incorrect, keep trying until you get it right.

The game is divided into five areas: Pattern Fun, Missing Image, Find Odd One, Find Shadow, and Flipmania (in the $0.99 paid version). For a child’s game, I found it engaging and it took me a few moments to figure out some of the puzzles. This app is a solid option for working on pattern recognition.

Peter Pig’s Money Counter (Free)

Peter Pig’s Money Counter, affiliated with the website Practical Money Skills, is a free game developed by Visa Inc. to help kids learn about currency. The game comes with the standard easy, medium, and hard difficulty levels. The games within the app are the same for each level, there are just more coins to count when playing the higher levels. The app uses images or photos of real money, so you will want to have a good screen resolution.

The entirety of Peter Pig’s Money Counter is narrated, so your elementary student won’t have to read, and focus all their attention on counting. There are a number of different types of games you can play. Players organize coins by type in The value of money, figure out the total amount in count off, and add up the amount in separate piles in which is greater. As you play and win, your bank increases in value. Unfortunately, the game does not save your bank, so you start over each time. If only Peter Pig’s Money Counter came with the option to start an IRA.

Wordseeker (Free)

Wordseeker is a free app supported by a permanent small banner ad at the bottom of the screen. It is a very minimal app with no real directions, but it doesn’t seem to need any. Simply put, Wordseeker is a word search game. The game comes with normal and hard difficulty settings, and keeps score for you for each level and category. The game has a ton of categories to choose from, such as Sports, Jewels, Vegetables, Colors, Animals, Machines, Fruit, and more.

During the game you can skip a puzzle and shuffle the letters. There is no timer, but there is also no way to save progress. To select a word in the puzzle, simply slide your finger over the letters to highlight the letters. The app does not show you the category you are working with, so you will need to remember that each time you play. I found the lettering a bit small, but it’s probably a non-issue for younger eyes. Overall, it is a good game that might help transform your elementary level student into the top speller in their class. Who knows? One day, your kid might thank Wordseeker for transforming her or him into a spelling bee champion.

Do you have kids enrolled in elementary school? What games do they like to play, other than Angry Birds? There are a lot of great apps out there to help your kids learn. Why not give them a try?

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